Thursday, February 18, 2016

#100 Quality Control and Error Correction

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 was given jointly to three scientists who discovered repair mechanisms in our DNA.

“The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 is awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information. Their work has provided fundamental knowledge of how a living cell functions and is, for instance, used for the development of new cancer treatments.” [1, also links to illustrations below]


“Damages occur to your DNA every day.” Sara Snogerup Linse is the chair of the Nobel Committee for chemistry. ‘In fact, right here, right now, if all those errors were left uncorrected, your genetic material would have very little resemblance to the original chromosomes in your very first cell. Life as we know it today is totally dependent on DNA repair mechanisms, as have been revealed in molecular detail by this year’s chemistry laureates.’” [2]

Think about what Nobel Prize Chemists are actually saying. This is totally anti-evolution. Our DNA repairs itself. Maybe that seems like it is not important, or perfectly natural, unless you think about it for a few minutes. What is DNA repairing itself from? Why mutations of course. DNA does not like mutations and actually has at least three different ways of fighting against mutation, and trying to stop mutation, and repairing against it when it does happens (which is often).

Now evolutionists will have an even more difficult time explaining that their mechanism for developing new species is even remotely possible. Scientists have shown that mutation cannot really be the process for change.

Here is what the Nobel Academy said about Dr. Paul Modrich’s discovery of the “mismatch repair mechanism”.

"This mechanism, mismatch repair, reduces the error frequency during DNA replication by about a thousand fold," the academy said. [3]

The Nobel Prize was given to a man who made evolution about a thousand times more difficult. Imagine what science will finally discover in the future if they keep going.


This quote is from a CNN article about the Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar won "for having mapped, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information."

The organization (prize committee) tweeted graphics explaining the scientists' work. [1]

Lindahl, a Swedish scientist, showed that "DNA decays at a rate that ought to have made the development of life on Earth impossible," the academy said.

"This insight led him to discover a molecular machinery, base excision repair, which constantly counteracts the collapse of our DNA."

Modrich, an American, showed how a cell corrects errors that occur when DNA is replicated during cell division.

"This mechanism, mismatch repair, reduces the error frequency during DNA replication by about a thousand fold," the academy said.

Sancar, a U.S. and Turkish citizen, mapped nucleotide excision repair -- the mechanism that cells use to repair UV damage to DNA, the academy said.

"People born with defects in this repair system will develop skin cancer if they are exposed to sunlight, it said. [4]

Here is another important statement.

“Paul Modrich showed how cells correct errors that take place during DNA replication, every time a cell divides. This mismatch repair fixes some 99.9 percent of the errors that take place.” [5]


That means almost 100% of DNA errors are repaired, which makes evolution virtually impossible. Here is another amazing statement in a report.

“Towards the end of the 1960s, many scientists considered DNA to be incredibly stable. But working at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Dr. Lindahl worked out that there must be thousands of potentially damaging attacks on the genome every day – an onslaught that would make human life impossible.” [6]

The Nobel Prize Committee admitted that human life should be impossible because DNA is so fragile. Dr. Lindahl, way back in 1974 (42 years ago) proposed a mechanism to explain how we could even exist despite the fact that our DNA is so unstable. (Note, we shouldn’t be here. We are a miracle.)

Here are some more statements in the report by The Guardian and some more from the Nobel Committee.

“From the moment an egg is fertilized it begins to divide. Two cells become four, four cells become eight. After one week a human embryo consists of 128 cells, each with its own set of genetic material. Unravel all that DNA and it would stretch for 300 meters.

“But many billions more divisions take place on the path to adulthood, until we carry enough DNA in our trillions of cells to reach 250 times to the sun and back. The most remarkable feat is how the genetic information is copied so faithfully. ‘From a chemical perspective, this ought to be impossible,’ the Nobel committee said.

“‘All chemical processes are prone to random errors. Additionally, your DNA is subjected on a daily basis to damaging radiation and reactive molecules. In fact, you ought to have been a chemical chaos long before you even developed into a fetus,’ they added.” [7]

The chemists admitted that “from a chemical perspective” it is impossible. Obviously, something beyond chemistry must be at work here.

Here’s the truth that evolutionists must now face. Their theory about a slow and gradual step by step process for species development must now overcome the newly established chemistry of DNA repair mechanisms. How can evolution claim that mutation is their operating process when it is being reversed 99.9% of the time by these Nobel Prize winning repair mechanisms?

Have you ever tried to go someplace by taking two steps forward and two steps back? The Theory of Evolution starts from very simple organisms and ends up after a long climb at millions of extremely complicated structures. But evolution can never even get started without DNA. Now we find that DNA basically won’t mutate because it already has inside itself an anti-mutant mechanism in place.

DNA repair mechanisms are like “quality control” in a manufacturing plant. Here is a definition:

"’Quality control’ is a system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in an existing product or service by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required.” [8]

In order for this DNA repair system to function, I can name at least six separate actions that are required. You have to be able to (1) inspect the DNA replications for errors, (2) recognize when there is a copying error or failure and exactly where it is, (3) turn on a repair mechanism, (4) fix the error, (5) turn off the repair mechanism, and (6) check to see if the repair was successful. Sounds a lot like intelligence was required at a very highly sophisticated level that human beings can only imagine.

There must be God.
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[1] The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Press Release, October 7, 2015, http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2015/press.html


[2]  Scientific American.Com, "2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry", By Steve Mirsky on October 7, 2015, http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/2015-nobel-prize-in-chemistry/

[3] CNN.Com, "Nobel Prize for chemistry awarded to 3 scientists for DNA repair studies", By Holly Yan and Don Melvin, CNN Updated 9:32 AM ET, Wed October 7, 2015, http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/07/world/europe/nobel-prize-chemistry/

[4] CNN.Com, "Nobel Prize for chemistry awarded to 3 scientists for DNA repair studies", By Holly Yan and Don Melvin, CNN Updated 9:32 AM ET, Wed October 7, 2015, http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/07/world/europe/nobel-prize-chemistry/

[5]  Scientific American.Com, "2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry", By Steve Mirsky on October 7, 2015, http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/2015-nobel-prize-in-chemistry/

[6] The Guardian.Com, "Nobel prize for chemistry: Lindahl, Modrich and Sancar win for DNA research", by Ian Sample and James Randerson, October 7, 2015, https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/oct/07/lindahl-modrich-and-sancar-win-nobel-chemistry-prize-for-dna-research

[7] The Guardian.Com, "Nobel prize for chemistry: Lindahl, Modrich and Sancar win for DNA research", by Ian Sample and James Randerson, October 7, 2015, https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/oct/07/lindahl-modrich-and-sancar-win-nobel-chemistry-prize-for-dna-research

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